Reviews  

Homefront (PC)

Nikhil Pradhan 2011-05-27
72 Good
Price: Rs 699
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Page 1: Introduction & Story

Homefront epitomizes the AAA title- high production values, a big name from Hollywood attached to it, a flashy marketing campaign and FPS gameplay that can be described as cinematic. If you are a fan of the CoDs and the Medal of Honors of the world, then you probably have been waiting for Homefront.

Let's see if the game can break away from the mould created by other FPS games and offer something new and exciting to PC gamers.

If I had to rate Homefront on its story and setting alone, it would get a hard 90 rating from me.


What's it About

If I had to rate Homefront on its story and setting alone, it would get a hard 90 rating from me. The plot is essentially what makes Homefront such an attractive draw because it's quite clear that there was a lot of effort put in by the writers. Like the newer Call of Duty games, Homefront is set in the not-so-distant future where America is on a serious downward slope with rising fuel prices and out of control wars in the Middle East. On the other hand, after the death of (current) North Korean leader, Kim Jong-il, his heir Kim Jong-un has united both Koreas and is now on a expansionist spree. After conquering Japan and most of Asia, Korean troops land in the USA and forcibly take over the country using an EMP blast and irradiating the Mississippi River to destabilize the American troops.


In 2027, pest control is a serious business.

All of this backstory is told through a nicely produced introduction video that makes the setting seem all the more plausible. The story is given its sheen by the game's primary writer John Milius, who has written the critically acclaimed movie Apocalypse Now and directed the movie, Red Dawn (that has a very similar plot that dealt with an invasion of the USA by the Soviet Union).


In his younger years, he used to play in the mid-field for Man Utd.

The game puts you in the shoes of an American resistance fighter on the run from the Korean troops. Unfortunately, the protagonist is from the Gordon Freeman school of non-speaking characters but while the Half-Life scientist's character was more along the lines of a legend idolized by the NPC's (and as a result, in control of all his actions), in Homefront, at no time do you feel like a hero but rather like an everyday (albeit multi-talented) grunt who is told exactly what to do and when to do it. For me that was a big turn-off and although I understand that one man doesn't amount to much in a war, it's not exactly the best thing to play a robot either in a game where you are the protagonist.

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